In response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the CGP Board of Directors unanimously voted to present the 2020 CGP Conference entirely online. The safety of our members must be our top priority. Plans are already underway to present a premier online conference using industry-leading technology and the very latest best practices in successful online meetings.

Bonus! On-demand Sessions

We had more great speakers than space in our virtual tracks. View these sessions as your time permits and communicate with the speakers in chat and at meet-ups where you can ask questions and network with others who share your interest in the topics.

 

On-Demand

Navigating Planned Gift Conversations with Your Donors

Jason Shuba

The Baby Boomer generation will recede over the next 30 years and pass trillions to subsequent generations. Your well-timed gift planning conversations will ensure your organization isn't left out of the process. Are you comfortable bringing up the topic of a planned gift with a long-time supporter of your mission? Are you prepared to respond effectively if a donor mentions he’s thinking of including your organization in his will? Or if she says she’s considering making your institution the beneficiary of her insurance policy? Or if he has already provided for your cause in his living trust but doesn’t want to share a crumb of paperwork? This session will help you feel more at ease in these conversations by offering you prompts and specific suggestions you can call on during your own donor work.

Learning Objectives

  • Broach gift planning options based on the motivations of the prospect/donor before you.
  • Identify and follow a suggested interaction path when a prospect/donor is considering or has already finalized a revocable deferred gift commitment.
  • Conduct more systematic and intentional planned gift stewardship interactions.

 

Jason Shuba

As Director of Gift Planning at the University of Illinois Foundation (UIF), Jason Shuba liaisons with the University of Illinois at Chicago, UI Health and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Gies College of Business to help alumni and friends make complex, deferred and noncash gifts to benefit the University of Illinois. Since joining UIF in January 2018, he's helped facilitate significant new gift commitments to benefit the University and rolled out to his advancement colleagues an internally-developed, best-in-class gift planning resource suite. Jason previously served as a Senior Gift Planning Officer with the American National Red Cross where he reinvigorated the organization’s dormant Greater Chicago gift planning program. He arrived in gift planning after managing the advancement vertical for Academic Impressions, a Denver-based higher-education professional development company. Jason earned his JD from Case Western Reserve University and BA cum laude from Denison University. He keeps an active Illinois law license, runs six days a week and really wants to talk with you about the "Black Mirror" episode "San Junipero."

On-Demand

Best Manager Ever

Anne Morgan

Good fundraisers do not automatically make good managers of fundraisers. In this session we will discuss the qualities of a good manager, and how to integrate them into your relationships with your staff. Gift planning officers have both special skills and special needs. If you have been promoted to supervising others from a gift planning position, you likely have not received much management training and might need a bit of perspective and some concrete steps to take to inspire success in your staff. Through real-life examples and practical exercises, you will learn to identify and address common issues, develop an outline for improving your management skills and gather ideas for inspiring and motivating your gift planning staff. You’ll be on your way to becoming the Best Manager Ever.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify areas to improve as a manager.
  • Create steps to give downline staff autonomy.
  • Learn when firing an employee is appropriate.

 

Anne Morgan

Anne M. Morgan, Director of Estate and Planned Giving at the Field Museum, has over 20 years of experience in estate and planned giving, and is a sought-after trainer and presenter in the areas of planned giving, nonprofit law and tax law. She earned her BA in Communications from Purdue University, her JD from Valparaiso University School of Law, and her LLM in tax law from Washington University, St. Louis. She has worked for a variety of organizations of different sizes and missions to successfully grow their legacy giving programs, including Northern Arizona University, Arizona State University, Saint Mary’s College in Notre Dame, and The Salvation Army. Focusing on the practical aspects of planned giving for a strong return on investment, Anne emphasizes prioritizing activity and building relationships both with donors and with colleagues. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Chicago Council on Planned Giving, a former Director of the Planned Giving Roundtable of Arizona, and licensed to practice law in Missouri and Indiana. She also is a graduate of the Dale Carnegie Leadership Training for Managers.

On-Demand

Bequest Administration: Longer than a Chicago Winter

Rob Smitherman and James Hodgson

A longtime donor has died, someone whom you have managed for years. The donor told you about her planned gift, and now your work together will pay off. Great! The money should come this week and for the purpose you discussed, right? New gift officers--and even those who have worked with donors for years--need to understand what happens after a planned giving donor dies. In this session for foundational and intermediate learning, we will discuss the administration of an estate gift to a charity. We will discuss protocols for working with the estate representatives, the timeline of an estate administration, procedures for internal tracking and reporting of bequests in the pipeline and how to address the various issues that may frustrate a charity’s timely receipt of a bequest or the ultimate use of the funds. The two presenters bring different views and perspectives and will discuss and contrast the approaches of both The University of Chicago and Northwestern University.

Learning Objectives

  • Gain a general overview of the estate settlement process including the types of gifts, relevant parties and timeline.
  • Understand the importance of establishing protocols to effectively manage a portfolio of realized bequest files and communicate with, and report to, stakeholders and leadership at the charity.
  • Appreciate the various issues and challenges that can arise in the estate administration process and learn some important tools to effectively address the same.

 

Rob Smitherman

Rob Smitherman joined the Northwestern University Gift Planning team in February 2015. He is the director of Gift Planning Administration, heading a team that deals with realized gifts that come through trusts and estates. He also manages the administration of life insurance gifts, life income gifts such as charitable gift annuities and charitable remainder trusts, donor advised funds, and gifts of tangible personal property. Rob is originally from Virginia, where he attended Washington & Lee University and the College of William & Mary. He practiced law in Danville, Virginia, for 22 years in a general civil practice that included contracts, real estate, and trusts and estates matters. He moved to Chicago in 2006, where he worked for a real estate development firm and an international events organization. Rob held temporary positions in the exotic locations of Cologne, Germany, and Cleveland, Ohio, before returning to Chicago permanently in 2015.

James Hodgson

After practicing trust and estate law for eleven years, primarily in Southern California, James Hodgson accepted the position of Senior Associate Director, Gift Planning and Bequest Administration, at The University of Chicago in May of 2017. In this role, Jim oversees trust and estate settlement for all schools and units across the University, including the College, Booth School of Business, Law School, and UChicago Medicine. Jim is also the primary point in development for all in-kind gifts, and he advises fundraisers and other staff on various issues that arise with gift acceptance, donor acknowledgment and policies and guidelines for the booking of gifts. Jim grew up outside of Los Angeles, obtaining his undergraduate degree from Pomona College in 2002 and JD from the UCLA School of Law in 2005. Jim practiced with a small trusts and estates firm in Santa Monica for four years before relocating to the Chicago area. He continued to practice remotely before opening up his own firm in 2012, advising clients on estate planning, probate and trust administration and contested matters.

On-Demand

A Highly-Visual Guide to 4-Tier Accounting for Charitable Remainder Trusts

Gregory Baker

You’ve heard about LIFO Accounting and FIFO Accounting, but do you really know how CRT 4-Tier Accounting works? CRTs are subject to a specific type of accounting that doesn’t exist anywhere else. Some people call CRT accounting WIFO (Worst In-First Out) or HITFO (Highest Income Tax First Out). It’s actually a little more complicated than that. This presentation will be a visual guide to the unique 4-tier accounting rules that apply to CRTs. We will visually show the impact of a donor’s choice to fund the CRT with retirement assets at death instead of funding the CRT with mutual funds or cash. We will visually show how the variety of funding possibilities including stocks, bonds, tangible property and artwork impact the 4-tiers and sometimes create “more than 4 tears” for the CRT’s income beneficiaries. We will also visually show how investment choices made by the CRT’s investment managers impact the 4-tiers. Our examples will focus primarily on NIMCRUTs and SCRUTs because they are used more commonly than CRATs.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn general principles for describing 4-tier accounting to donors.
  • See visually the tax differences based on the asset the donor gives to their CRT.
  • See visually the tax differences based on investment choices by the money manager.

 

Gregory Baker

Gregory W. Baker, JD, ChFC®, CFP®, CAP, is Executive Vice President of Renaissance Philanthropic Solutions Group, the nation’s largest independent charitable gift solutions provider. For the past 29 years, he has provided trust, tax and philanthropic financial planning advice to over 4,000 attorneys and 8,000 development officers, and financial planners in all 50 states regarding more than 20,000 charitable remainder trusts, more than 800 charitable lead trusts and numerous foundations, charitable gift annuities and donor-advised funds. His advice has helped donors contribute over $6 billion to charitable gift plans. Greg is a past Board Member of the National Association of Charitable Gift Planners, a past President of the Charitable Gift Planners Indiana, an Advisory Board Member of the Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy designation at the American College, member of the Financial Planning Association and the Indiana Bar. He was previously VP, Charitable Fiduciary Risk Manager for the Merrill Lynch Center for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Management in Princeton, NJ. Greg speaks at national and local conferences for professional advisors, high net worth clients and charities regarding charitable gift planning, asset-allocation, investment modeling, and tax issues.

On-Demand

Shaping winning, ongoing Legacy Challenge programs - lessons from the field

John Kendrick and Louisa Sizemore and Mohammad Ziaidi and Sara Eigenberg

Legacy challenge programs (also known as bequest challenge programs) have existed for more than a decade, with impressive results across a wide array of nonprofit organizations. These programs are effective because they meet a variety of donor needs and offer incentives that stimulate action. This session shares learning and strategies from a large multifaceted university (George Washington University), a major cultural/religious organization (the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum), a national advocacy group (American Civil Liberties Union), and an international environmental organization (Friends of the Earth). Common principles underlie these organizations' successes with their challenge programs, while the diversity of their work and their specific legacy challenge approaches show that virtually any organization can succeed with a thoughtfully conceived challenge. The panelists will describe how Legacy Challenges can be effective in meeting multiple fundraising goals and strategies in a variety of settings. These include launching a new Planned Giving program, revitalizing a planned giving program, launching or wrapping up a campaign, increasing the average size of bequest commitments, stimulating constituents to reveal the value of previously existing bequests, and more.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn how to craft a legacy challenge program that syncs with your organization's unique structure and current state of fundraising.
  • Understand how to repeat a legacy challenge program and make it an important ongoing feature of a successful planned giving program.
  • Understand how to achieve high-level buy-in within your organization and move from concept to implementation.

 

John Kendrick

John Kendrick joined the George Washington University in April, 2008. He leads a team of six planned giving professionals and two support staff who serve all areas of the University. Under John’s leadership, GW expanded the university’s emphasis on gift planning and instituted a full-service real estate philanthropy program. The University raised $196 million of new and realized planned gifts during the $1 billion Making History comprehensive campaign for GW and has raised more than $300 million in planned gifts during John’s 12-year tenure at GW. Previously, he was the Director of Planned Giving for the Smithsonian Institution, where he led planned giving for the Smithsonian's 19 museums and nine research centers. He also held development positions at the National Academy of Sciences and Hood College. His development work follows an 18-year career in advertising, publishing and marketing, including positions as a Vice President at DDB Worldwide, Editor-in-Chief of Targeted Marketing Solutions and Senior Account Executive at Young & Rubicam, Inc. John has a BA in Economics and Government from Cornell, an MBA from Wharton Business School and a Masters degree from the Medill School of Journalism.

Louisa Sizemore

Louisa Sizemore joined the George Washington University in 2020 as a Director of Planned Giving. In addition to maintaining a portfolio of prospects, she acts as planned giving liaison for several of GW’s schools. Prior to GW, Louisa worked in planned giving for environmental nonprofits for more than eight years. She began her planned giving career at The Nature Conservancy and, most recently, launched a planned giving program and Legacy Challenge at Friends of the Earth. She is a graduate of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where she majored in zoology and environmental science. Louisa is a member of the National Association of Charitable Gift Planners and the National Capital Gift Planning Council.

Mohammad Ziaidi

Mohammad Zaidi has served as the Director of Gift Planning with the American Civil Liberties Union for the past 15 years. He led the $850 million planned gift component of the ACLU’s Centennial Campaign, which ended in March 2020. Mohammad was formerly a Lecturer on the adjunct faculty with Columbia University’s Master’s in Nonprofit Management Program. In his 30-year career in development, he has served with the National Audubon Society, Boy Scouts of America Greater New York Councils, Planned Parenthood Federation of America and The New York Public Library. Mohammad is a past president of the Philanthropic Planning Group of Greater New York. He studied Economics at the Stern School of Business at New York University.

Sara Eigenberg

Sara Eigenberg is the Deputy Director of Planned Giving and Endowments for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, where she has worked since 2002. Sara's primary responsibilities include cultivating, soliciting and securing deferred gifts in New England, the West Coast and the Southwest, along with handling the full administration of all matured estate gifts benefiting the Museum. Since 2009, under the umbrella of an Endowment Campaign and three successful Legacy Challenges, Sara, along with her planned giving colleagues, have built a vibrant planned giving program that has to date raised well in excess of $150 million in known deferred commitments. Sara earned her BA from the State University of New York at Geneseo and her JD, cum laude, from the Antonin Scalia Law School - George Mason University. She is currently admitted to practice law in the state of Virginia.

This conference teaches me how to talk to my donors and gives me the technical behind the scenes skills that give me the confidence in front of smart people who have smart goals for their philanthropy.
CGP Conference
October 7-9, 2020
Presented Online
Register Now